Current Fellows

Arija Birze is a PhD student at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health in the Social & Behavioural Health Sciences stream. She received her Master of Arts in Sociology & Equity Studies in Education from OISE/UT in 2009. Before starting her doctoral program, Arija worked at the Wilson Centre as a Research Analyst II. She is now a 2014-16 Currie Fellowship recipient. Her current research interests include how the gendered organization of emotional, high stress occupations is written into the body and biologically translated into health inequalities. Supervisor(s): Elise Paradis


Madison Brydges is a Health Studies PhD student in the Department of Health, Aging and Society at McMaster University under the supervision of Dr. Jim Dunn. She completed her Master of Arts from McMaster University and a Bachelor of Science specializing in Paramedicine from the University of Toronto. Her research takes a sociological approach to explore changes to paramedic roles within the context of broader health care system reforms. Supervisor(s): Dr Elise ParadisDr. Walter Tavares 


Leigh Chapman is a PhD Candidate at the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing under the supervision of Sioban Nelson. Leigh’s doctoral research will explore how regulated health professionals competency assessment is understood in a Canadian academic hospital. Supervisor(s): Dr Brian Hodges, Dr Elise Paradis


Jeffrey Cheung is a PhD student of the Institute of Medical Science at the University of Toronto. Previously, he completed a HBSc in Neuroscience and a MSc in Medical Science. His PhD research explores the impact of integrating conceptual (Knowing Why) and procedural knowledge (Knowing How) in the instructional design of simulation-based procedural skills, with a specific interest in the transfer of learning to novel contexts that require adaptive expertise. Supervisor(s): Ryan BrydgesCarol-anne Moulton


Steve Durant is a PhD candidate at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He has a Master’s in Public policy, Administration and Law from York University and a BA in political science from Memorial University. Steve’s dissertation project is a critical historical analysis of reform of mental health services from the early nineteenth century to the present. Inspired by the methodological and theoretical contributions of feminist sociologist Dorothy Smith and social historian Michel Foucault, this research explores the relationship between discourse and actual developments in policy and practice at the systemic and institutional levels. Supervisor(s): Fiona Webster


Jacquelin Forsey is a first-year MSc student in the Rehabilitation Science Institute at the University of Toronto, and a research fellow at the Wilson Centre and the Centre for Ambulatory Care Education. Under the supervision of Dr. Nikki Woods and Dr. Stella Ng, she is employing statistical semantics to explore the way clinicians are taught to speak to aging patients and about the older population. Supervisors:  Stella Ng and Nikki Woods


Joanne Goldman (Post-Doc) completed her PhD at the Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto in 2015. Her thesis work “An ethnography of interprofessional interactions in discharge in a Canadian acute care setting”, was supported by a CIHR Doctoral Research Award. She is now working as a post-doctoral fellow in a collaborative position between The Centre for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto and Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, and is continuing as a fellow at The Wilson Centre. Joanne is interested in using sociologically informed theoretical and methodological perspectives to study quality improvement and patient safety and interprofessional education and practice. Her post-doctoral work is a case study examination of post-licensure quality improvement education, with attention to the socio-cultural and structural factors that shape health care professionals’ quality improvement education and clinical practices, and the intersections between education and practice. Supervisor(s): Ayelet  KuperCynthia Whitehead


Jamie Kellar is a PhD candidate at the School of Health Professions Education (SHE), Maastricht University, and a Fellow at the Wilson Centre supervised by Dr. Elise Paradis. She received an Honours Bachelor of Science (human kinetics) from the University of Guelph, and a Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy and a Doctor of Pharmacy degree, both from the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto.  Jamie is a registered pharmacist and an Assistant Professor – teaching stream at the Faculty of Pharmacy, U of T.  For her PhD studies she is using a Foucauldian approach to explore the dominant discourses of pharmacist identity over the last century in North America, questioning the past to shape the future of pharmacy practice. Supervisor: Elise Paradis


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Amit Kaushal has completed training in adult nephrology, and is now a resident in the Clinician Educator Training Program at the University of Toronto. He is a first year student in the MSc.CH – Health Practitioner Teacher Education program at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and a Research Fellow at the Wilson Centre under the supervision of Dr. Maria Mylopoulos and Dr. Nicole Woods. His research will explore the development and maintenance of medical expertise, with a specific focus on the role of activities that promote preparation for future learning. Supervisor(s): Nicole WoodsMaria Mylopoulos


Rabia Khan is a PhD student at the Institute of Medical Science and Research Fellow at the Wilson Centre, University of Toronto. Previously, Rabia completed an honours B.Sc. (Life Science) and B.A. (Political Science). She is currently part of the Collaborative Program in Global Health at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health. Her current research interests lie in the intersection of global health and medical education. Her work focuses on the ‘health of health workers’ and specific to her PhD, on the systemic factors that affect the mental health of physicians in training. Supervisor(s): Brian HodgesTina Martimianakis


Michael Kim is a PhD student at the Institute of Medical Science at the University of Toronto.  He previously completed a Masters Degree at the University of Illinois and a research fellowship in Medical and Surgical Education at Southern Illinois University.  His research interests include workplace based assessment and understanding perceptions of physician competence in clinical settings.  Michael’s current focus is on the social influences upon evaluation of resident physicians in danger of remediation or failure.  He is also a practicing Trauma Surgeon and specialist in Critical Care Medicine.  Supervisor: Carol-anne Moulton.


Andrea Kirou-Marou is a resident in the Pediatric Clinician Investigator program pursuing a Master of Science in Health Science Education at McMaster University under the supervision of Lawrence Grierson. She is also a fellow at the Wilson Centre under the supervision of Ryan Brydges. Andrea’s research focuses on mastery learning through simulation, the acquisition of procedural skills and the prevention of skill decay. Supervisor(s): Ryan Brydges


Patti Leake is a PhD student at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Toronto under the supervision of Elise Paradis and Heather Boon. She completed an honours degree in biology at Queen's University, and a teaching degree at Simon Fraser University.  Her research interests are in midwifery research capacity building and the discourse of research in the profession of midwifery in Ontario. Supervisor: Elise Paradis


Lindsay Melvin is a PGY5 fellow in General Internal Medicine a the University of Toronto and a candidate in the Masters of Health Professions Education (MHPE) at Maastricht University. Lindsay is a research fellow at the Wilson Centre under the guidance of Dr. Kuper and Dr. Kulasegaram and a joint CEEP research fellow. Her research interests include the examining the instruction and assessment of communication skills for medical residents and medical students and the role of communication skills in the daily practice of clinicians at all levels of training.  Supervisor(s): Ayelet  KuperMahan Kulasegaram


Justin Mausz is a PhD candidate in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McMaster University.  Justin received an Honours Bachelor of Health Sciences degree at the University of Ontario and a Master of Science in Health Science Education at McMaster University.  Justin is a practicing paramedic and holds a faculty appointment at Centennial College with teaching responsibilities in the paramedic program.  Justin's research focus is on the role of context in learning and the use of authentic learning contexts, including simulation-based learning.  Supervisor: Walter Tavares


Laura Naismith (Post-Doc) completed her PhD in Educational Psychology at McGill University in 2013. She currently holds the Ray Chang Postdoctoral Fellowship in Medical Education at the HoPingKong Centre for Excellence in Education and Practice at the Toronto Western Hospital, a joint fellowship with the Wilson Centre. Her research focuses on supporting medical trainees in simulation-based procedural skills training, by addressing cognitive, motivational and affective dimensions of learning. Supervisor: Nicole Woods


Ahmed Omar completed his training in Adult Rheumatology at the University of Toronto. He is currently a subspecialty/spondylitis clinical fellow at the Toronto Western Hospital. He is a first-year MSc student at the Institute of Medical Science (IMS). Under the supervision of Dr. Nicole Woods and Dr. Robert Inman, his research will focus on the role of basic science and technology in advancing clinical training within the field of Rheumatology. Supervisor(s): Nicole Woods


Robert Paul is a PhD candidate at the Institute of Health Policy, Management & Evaluation. With a background in financial management and politics, he is interested in the developing narrative of rising costs and declining revenue in health care. Drawing on social science theories, Robert’s research explores processes related to revenue generation and globalization and their impact on academic health science centres. Supervisor(s): Tina Martimianakis


Cristian Rangel is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology, UofT. His dissertation studies how physicians’ humanitarian and advocacy work for refugee care and non-status immigrants influence human rights and political discourse in Canada and Spain. In both countries, physicians have organized political protests and challenged their governments for curtailing the health care rights of non-status immigrants in the name of national values and fiscal responsibility. These two cases are exemplars of important transformations in political and professional power fields in Western democracies. Canadian Doctors for Refugee Care (CDRC) is a homegrown political and professional phenomenon, while the Spanish’s Medicos del Mundo (MDM) is an international humanitarian organization. Despite their organizational differences and mandates, both groups mobilize evidence-based rationales to challenge the state in order to reinstate the health care rights of refugees and non-status immigrants in each country. Supervisor(s): Mathieu Albert


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David Rojas is an engineer and currently a PhD candidate at the Institute of Medial Science, University of Toronto. He is also a fellow at the Wilson Centre under the supervision of Ryan Brydges. His research focuses on program evaluation, specifically on creating a framework to a conduct program evaluation with a holistic approach. Using his background knowledge in engineering David evaluates educational programs in health professions education beyond “do they work?”. His framework is meant to capture unintended/emergent processes and outcomes, as well as planned processes and outcomes, to better understand the real effect/impact of the programs under evaluation. David also has expertise working with online platforms as preparatory tools for simulation. He is an advocate for the use of new technology in education, specifically simulation, virtual reality and game-enhanced educational environments. Supervisor(s): Ryan Brydges


Naomi Steenhof is a Masters student in the School of Health Professions Education at Maastricht University. She previously completed a Bachelor of Pharmacy degree at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include exploring the role of basic sciences in pharmacy education and preparation for future learning. Supervisors: Nikki Woods and Maria Mylopoulos


Patricia Thille (Post-Doc) holds the Wilson Centre’s Currie Fellowship (2015-2016) for post-doctoral work. She obtained her physical therapy degree in 1998 (University of Saskatchewan) and completed her PhD in Sociology in 2015 (University of Calgary; supervised by Drs. Arthur Frank and Liza McCoy). She applies social theories developed within ethnomethodological, science studies, Foucauldian, and gender studies traditions to study clinical care and health professions education specific to health conditions shaped by bias and stigma. She is particularly interested in studying the effects - broadly considered - of practices of objectification and standardization that influence clinical care. Supervisor(s): Cynthia WhiteheadAyelet  Kuper


Anastasia(Stasey)Tobin is a PhD candidate at the Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto and a Fellow at the Wilson Centre supervised by Dr. Vicki Leblanc. She received an honours BSc in clinical nutrition from the University of Western Ontario and a MHSc in public health nutrition from the University of Toronto. Drawing upon social theory and science and technology studies, Anastasia is exploring how children and their families engage with health care professionals to care for cystic fibrosis as they cycle through the clinic and home life. Anastasia’s graduate studies have been supported by: a 2015 University of Toronto Doctoral Completion Award, the 2012-14 Currie Fellow at the Wilson Centre, a CIHR Banting and Best Canada Graduate Scholarship and a CIHR Cross-STIHR Fellowship in Healthcare, Technology and Place at the University of Toronto.  Supervisor(s): Cynthia Whitehead


Rene Wong MSc obtained his MD degree at Dalhousie University, then completed internal medicine residency followed by a fellowship in Endocrinology. He has been on faculty as a Clinician-Educator at the University of Toronto, Department of Medicine since 2009. In 2014 he started a Masters degree through the Institute of Medical Science with the goal to use a Foucauldian approach to how clinical practice guidelines in diabetes impacts the roles and relationships between family physicians and diabetes specialists. He continues to be involved in the development and implementation of continuing professional development activities in diabetes. Supervisor(s): Cynthia Whitehead


Wendy Yen obtained her M.A. from the University of Toronto in 2005 in Measurement and Evaluation. She has been leading research studies and program evaluations for the past ten years in health and educational settings. She is currently a Research Associate at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario and plays a key role in developing and evaluating assessment programs for physicians in practice. She is also the principle investigator leading a complex, multiyear initiative examining the performance of internationally trained medical graduates. She is currently pursuing a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in Adult Education and research interests include physician assessment, physician education, multi-source feedback, internationally trained medical graduates and program evaluation. Supervisor(s): Tina Martimianakis